Tagged: Mariano Rivera

The House That Ruth Built

Now batting for the New York Yankees, the shortstop, #2, Derek Jeter, #2.

I can still hear legendary Yankee Public Address Announcer Bob Sheppard introducing Derek Jeter for his first at bat on Sunday, September 21, 2008. Jeter walked to the plate while Sheppard’s voice echoed around Yankee Stadium. Jesse, John, and I had flown to New York solely to watch the Yankees play the Orioles in the final game at Yankee Stadium. The House That Ruth Built was closing.

Baseball brought me to New York City for the first time. I would later live and work in New York for five years, but that first visit was about baseball. Knowing we only had one game to explore one of the greatest ballparks in baseball we arrived at 161st Street Station in the Bronx around 9:30 am, 11 hours before first pitch. We were greeted by a sea of fans who, like us, we eager to spend the day inside the House That Ruth Built before it closed.

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We made it to The House That Ruth Built. (The Winning Run/ JJ)

The crowd outside the Stadium was chaotic, joyous, and a bit solemn all at once. The new Yankee Stadium stood just across the street, and except for a few glances I had little interest in the building. I had come to see THE Stadium, not its replacement. After slowly making our way through the line we finally entered the hallowed stadium. We soon learned our first stop would not happen. Monument Park was at capacity and the Yankees were closing it early. We scrapped our other plans and began exploring every nooks and cranny of the stadium that was accessible. We walked around the cheap seats, the foul lines, behind home plate, everywhere but our seats. Our seats were in the right field bleachers, with the Bleacher Creatures. Once you entered the bleacher area, security would not permit you to return to the rest of the stadium. We explored until our feet ached from the concrete. Once you join the Bleacher Creatures, there is no coming back.

Our first glimpse of the field was from behind home plate. Seeing the most famous baseball field in the world, where so much of the game’s history was made, where so many legends played, felt spiritual. I remember silently standing with Jesse and John gazing at the field, soaking it in. Three baseball fanatics in awe of their surroundings.

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The field is beautiful from the cheap seats (The Winning Run/JJ)
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Warming up before the game. (The Winning Run/JJ)
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Breathtaking. (The Winning Run/JJ)

Our day touring Yankee Stadium went by in a flash before we joined the Bleacher Creatures. The pregame festivities included Yankee legends returning to the field one last time. Yogi Berra, Whitey Ford, Reggie Jackson, and other living legends were joined by the ghosts of Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, among others. Fittingly Babe Ruth’s daughter, Julia Ruth Stevens, threw out the final first pitch in the House That Ruth Built.

Once the actual game began, it was like every Yankee game I would attend while living in New York. The nationally televised game between two teams who would finish the season a combined 36.5 games behind first place began at 8:36 p.m. There were plenty of people, like us, who were not the regulars among the Bleacher Creatures. It was easy to identify the Bleacher Creatures. They are loud, obnoxious, generally know their baseball, and above all are die hard Yankee fans. The chants began in the top of the first, roll call. Every Yankee, except the pitcher and catcher, had their name chanted until they acknowledged the Bleacher Creatures. Some players, like Bobby Abreu, waved quickly, others, like Johnny Damon, made us work for a few minutes before waving. The loudest chant was for the Captain, Derek Jeter. Jeter was the man; no one on the field commanded more respect than #2.

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Our seats with the Bleacher Creatures. (The Winning Run/JJ)

I remember only pieces of the actual game. We went to the game for the experience, not necessarily the actual game. The Bleacher Creatures did what they do best, being loud. I have clear memories of a chant regarding Hall of Fame player and then ESPN Sunday Night Baseball announcer Joe Morgan, who was broadcasting the game. The chant was simple, “Joe Morgan Sucks! Joe Morgan Sucks! Joe Morgan Sucks!” Over and over and over. I was never a fan of Morgan’s broadcasting, but the Bleacher Creatures were less bashful in voicing their opinion. Another memory is a different chant “Box Seats Suck! Box Seats Suck!” The metal bleachers in right field were anything but leisurious. They reminded me of the bench at a little league game. The most memorable moment sitting among the Bleacher Creatures happened when people sitting several rows in front of us attempting to start the wave. Yes the wave. Every time they tried to start the wave they were booed and told to “Take That Sh@$ Back To Shea!” Eventually stadium security and the New York Police Department stepped in. This was late in the game after beer could lower people’s inhibitions. Obviously the people threatening those trying to start the wave were removed by security. Wrong. Attempting to start the wave gets you removed to the cheers of the Bleacher Creatures. I might have missed something someone said or did, but I like to think they were arrested for attempting to start the wave at Yankee Stadium.

On the field, Jose Molina hit the final home run in Yankee Stadium with a fourth inning two run shot off Chris Waters to give the Yankees a 5-3 lead. The Yankees would stretch out their lead in the sixth inning with a Jason Giambi RBI single and a sacrifice fly by Robinson Cano to score Brett Gardner. The tension was palpable in an otherwise meaningless game. Everyone wanted one last Yankee victory inside the House That Ruth Built. The Yankees led 7-3 heading into the ninth inning.

The guitar riff blasted through the speakers. Metallica’s Enter Sandman filled the stadium. The greatest closer of all time was trotting in from the bullpen. 11 pitches and three groundouts later, Mariano Rivera closed Yankee Stadium.

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Mariano Rivera coming in to close out Yankee Stadium. (The Winning Run/JJ)
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The final out. (The Winning Run/JJ)
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Jesse and me after the game. (The Winning Run/JJ)
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John and me after the game. Note the mounted police on the field to keep people off.(The Winning Run/JJ)

The celebration was not the World Series many envisioned to close Yankee Stadium, it was still special. Derek Jeter spoke to the crowd, thanking the fans and creating a bridge between the two stadiums. He was brief and to the point before leading the Yankees around the field to say goodbye. Yankee Stadium was the House That Ruth Built and the House That Jeter Closed.

The game ended just before midnight. An era in baseball history was closed. No one wanted to leave. Grown men were tossing empty water bottles to the player’s kids on the warning track, begging them to fill the bottles with dirt before tossing them back. Every nook and cranny inside Yankee Stadium was filled with memories and the thought of never coming back was almost too much for some to bear. Normally at the end of a Major League game the ushers and security are quick to push you out of your seats. This was different, we stayed in our seats for an hour after the final out. The crowd was slow to disperse and the stadium staff did not have the usual urgency to clear the stadium. It was after 1 a.m. when we left Yankee Stadium. No one was in a hurry to leave the ghosts of baseball history alone in a now closed Yankee Stadium.

DJ

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The Summer of 1998: 20 Years Later

It has been 20 years since the dawn of the 1998 baseball season. The season would see one of the great teams of all time as the Yankees marched towards the World Series, meanwhile Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa were chasing the single season home run record. Knowing what we know now about many of the players who helped revive baseball that summer does diminish some of the fondness. However as Mark McGwire famously said before Congress, “I am not here to talk about the past.”

The 1994 players strike severely damaged baseball. The cancellation of the World Series and the delayed start of the 1995 season saw fans turn their backs on the game. Arguing who is blame, the players or the owners, for this dark time in baseball is for another day, what mattered then was how would the game win back the fans it lost. Some fans still see 1994 as the death of baseball, don’t believe me check out this Facebook group which has more than 22,000 members. Right or wrong baseball needed a season to get its fans back.

File photo of Baltimore Orioles Cal Ripken Jr. hittng a base hit in the eighth inning of his 2, 131st consecutive game in Baltimore
Cal Ripken Jr. gave baseball a moment it needed to draw fans back to the game. (REUTERS/ Gary Hershorn/Files)

Baseball got a much needed boost when Cal Ripken Jr. played his 2,131st consecutive game, passing Lou Gehrig for most consecutive games played on September 6, 1995. This was a moment baseball desperately needed showing the good of the game. It was however, a moment. Baseball needed more than one night of glory, it needed a season of suspense and wonderment.

The 1998 New York Yankees are one of the greatest teams ever assembled. The Boston Red Sox won 92 games, yet finished 22 games behind the Yankees in the division. The Yankees finished the season 114-48. The Bronx Bombers had eight players with at least 17 home runs, five players with at least 84 RBI, and eight players with 21 or more doubles. The Yankees hit .288 as a team. On the mound, all five Yankee starters had at least 12 wins, a team ERA of 3.82, with the starters averaging 6 ⅔ inning per start, plus Mariano Rivera nailing down 36 saves out of the bullpen. In the Playoffs, the Yankees swept the Texas Rangers in the American League Divisional Series three games to none, allowing only one run. In the American League Championship Series, the Yankees dispatched the Cleveland Indians in six games. In the World Series, New York swept the San Diego Padres in four games. The 98 win Padres were no match for the Yankees. The biggest team in baseball helped put the game back into people’s lives as they rolled through the season and playoffs. Yankee dominance helped, but the primary attraction was in the National League.

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There was little drama as the Yankees swept the World Series. (Jeff Haynes/ AFP/ Getty Images)

Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa later became the poster children for what was wrong with baseball, but in the summer of 1998 they were what made baseball relevant again for much of the country. Divisional rivals on two of the most prominent teams in the sport, McGwire and Sosa embarked on a home run race that captured the attention of the country. When Roger Maris broke the single season home run record held by Babe Ruth, there was backlash. People felt Ruth’s record should be left alone. When Maris ultimately hit home run number 61 in 1961 he did it in game 162, which many believe meant his record deserved an asterisk as he took more games than Ruth’s 154 game schedule in 1927. If McGwire, Sosa, or some other slugger could hit 60 home runs fewer than 154 games they would hold the record.

McGwire hit 11 home runs by the end of April, only to hit 16 in May to bring his season total to 27 as the calendar turned to June. On May 22nd, Sosa had only 9 home runs against McGwire’s 24. Over the next six weeks Sosa got red hot, hitting 24 home runs. Heading into the All Star Break, McGwire lead Sosa 37 home runs to 33. The race for 62 was on. McGwire hit his 50th home run of the season on August 20th, Sosa followed with his 50th three days later on August 23rd. However in between a whirlwind began on August 22nd regarding McGwire’s use of Androstenedione. McGwire maintained his use of Andro was legal and it did not give him any added benefits on the field. This is perhaps the clearest beginning of the steroid era entering public knowledge. The use of Andro did little to distract the public from the frenzy of the home run chase. September 8th saw McGwire hit his shortest home run of the season, 341 feet, just clearing the left field wall in Busch Stadium. McGwire and the Cardinals were hosting Sosa and the Cubs that night. After initially missing first base in the midst of his joy, quickly retreating to touch the missed base, McGwire rounded the bases to officially set the new single season home run mark at 62. Sosa would tie McGwire at 62 home runs on September 13th. As the 1998 season wound down the question turned to how high McGwire and Sosa would push the home run record. For the only time all season Sosa took the lead on September 25th, when he hit his 66th and final home run of the season. McGwire would finish with a flurry, hitting five home runs in the last three games of the season to finish with 70 home runs.

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The home run race between Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa helped revive baseball one home run at a time. (AP Photo/ Beth A. Keiser)

There was no doubt both McGwire and Sosa broke the single season home run record, Ruth’s and Maris’. Sosa would be named the National League Most Valuable Player, while McGwire got his name in the record books. The summer of chasing Ruth and Maris brought baseball the excitement back it lost in the 1994 players strike. The chase between McGwire and Sosa, coupled with the total dominance of the Yankees gave baseball the season it needed to win back fans and rebuild trust.

20 years have passed since the summer of 1998. We have learned so much about the men who played that summer. Far too many had their abilities aided by steroids and other performance enhancers. The steroid era was on full display, we just did not know it yet. The revival of baseball was both helped and hurt by the steroid era, many players have since fallen from grace. The game continues to grow and much of the magic I remember as a kid has returned. The summer of 1998 helped revive baseball, and yet my most vivid memory from that summer is having no interest in any of it. 1998 was my last season playing organized baseball. I had a coach who took the fun out of the game. He would scream and yell when the players, myself included, did not get a hit. He changed my batting stance over and over again. I came to dread going to baseball practice and games. The joy of playing baseball was gone. A year or so later I wanted to play for a travel team, but I was late to the tryout we did not get out of the car. This is how my baseball career ended. I am under no illusion I was good enough to play professionally, maybe not even in high school. However, one person ruined baseball, it took years for my love of the game to return. I hope he still remembers how great those handful of victories were for our Spring 11/12U rec league team 20 years ago.

DJ

To Catch A Thief

Christmas is not the only cause for celebration on December 25th. One of the most unique players in baseball history celebrates his birthday around the Christmas tree, Rickey Henderson. The career leader in Runs, Stolen Bases, Caught Stealing, and Self-Confidence turns 58 today.

The legendary speedster terrorized opposing pitchers and catchers for 25 seasons. Rickey Henderson’s game was built upon speed, confidence, and skill. Henderson had a career .279 BA and .401 OBP. Simply put, he got on base and then used his speed to help his team win.

Getting on base by a walk or a hit did not matter to Henderson, his job was to just get on base any way he could. The ability to know the strike zone means not chasing pitches out of the strike zone. Avoiding bad pitches forces the pitcher to throw strikes if they are serious about getting the batter out. However, his speed on the bases meant pitchers did not want to give Henderson a free pass which led to 3,055 hits and 297 career home runs. Force is mass times acceleration and Rickey Henderson had enough speed to spare for some added power. Pitchers were forced to decide if they wanted to play with speed or power, neither was a good option.

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Ricky Henderson never needed any extra advantage on the base paths. (www.90feetofperfection.com)

Rickey Henderson is second all time with 2,190 walks. He led the American League four times in walks and had seven seasons of 100 or more walks. A walk for a player with the speed and skill of Henderson was just as good as a hit. Henderson averaged 0.456 steals per game in his 25 season career. A walk meant a high probability of a man on second in the near future, so there was not much difference between a walk and a double.

The speed that made Henderson a Hall of Famer was never in short supply. Henderson stole 50 or more bases in 14 seasons and for three of those seasons he stole more than 100. He led the league in steals 12 times, and holds the all time record for most career steals with 1,406. Hall of Famer Lou Brock has the second most career steals with 938; Brock’s career total is about two-thirds of Henderson’s career total. It took Lou Brock 19 seasons to collect his 938 steals, whereas it only took Henderson 13 seasons to catch and pass Brock. Henderson played 12 more seasons after surpassing Brock’s record. The longevity of Henderson’s career has made the task of breaking the steals record among the most difficult records to break in all of baseball. Henderson first led the American League in steals in 1980 with 100 steals at 21 years old. He led the American League for the 12th and final time in 1998 with 66 steals at 39 years old. Even as he approached the twilight of his career, Henderson continued to run, he stole 109 bases after turning 40 years old.

Getting on base and stealing bases is exciting, but scoring runs is what matters most to the team. Henderson led the American League five times in runs scored, scored 100 or more runs in 13 seasons, and holds the all time career record with 2,295 runs scored. Getting on base means opportunities to score runs. Stealing a base or taking the extra base only increases the chance to score and puts pressure on the pitching and fielding.

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The self-proclaimed Greatest of All Time. (www.SI.com)

Examining the career or single season numbers for Rickey Henderson from now until eternity can only do so much to convince a person of his greatness. The true test of greatness is continued success despite the opponent knowing what you are trying to do. Much like Mariano Rivera throwing the cutter, the opposition knew when Henderson was going to steal and were mostly powerless to stop him. Henderson was successfully in 80.75% of his stolen base attempts; a success rate above 65% is considered good. Everyone in the ball park knew Henderson was going to steal when he got on, yet opposing pitchers and catchers could do little to prevent him from running wild. Henderson’s speed on the bases meant pitchers had to pay attention to him otherwise a walk could result with a man on second or third.

Rickey Henderson was elected to 10 All Star games, won the 1990 American League Most Valuable Player award, and was a first ballot Hall of Famer in an era that placed the emphasis on power not speed. He was not a return to the dead ball era of baseball where speed carried the day; rather Rickey Henderson was something baseball had never seen, and most likely never will again. Many players arrive in the Majors with the ability to steal bases and develop their home run power later. Only a select few have the ability to maintain their speed while developing that power. It’s a rare sight to see them causing havoc on the bases for 10 seasons, much less 25.

Happy Birthday to the Greatest of All Time

DJ

The Future Is Coming

The 2013 MLB All-Star Game was hosted by the New York Mets. Despite working in New York I could not attend the festivities (Bernie did though and one of our mutual friends got to attend the game because of a promotion at the Fan Fest). The 2015 MLB All-Star Game was hosted by the Cincinnati Reds, but I could not attend as I moved to Cincinnati about a week after the festivities ended. However, 2016 is the year I finally made it to the All Star Game, not in San Diego but the South Atlantic League Single A All-Star Game hosted by the Lexington Legends. Not what you may have expected.

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Great seats for a great game. (The Winning Run/ DJ)

Obviously these players are not household names, but I recognized a few of them. Luke Dykstra, son of Lenny Dykstra, plays for the Rome Braves. Mariano Rivera Jr., son of Mariano Rivera, plays for Hagerstown Suns. Tate Matheny, son of Mike Matheny, plays for the Greenville Drive. Every player selected to this All Star game has a ways to go before leaving a lasting legacy on the game.

The game itself produced some great baseball. Diving catches, beautifully played ground balls, and excellent pitching. The game featured 22 strikeouts, 11 for each team. Each of the 15 pitchers who pitched a complete inning had at least one strike out, with Jake Cosart of the Greenville Drive striking out the side during his inning of work. The game itself was fun and the players and fans were clearly enjoying the experience. The weather was perfect for the 8,126 fans who watched a crisp game played in under two and a half hours. The casual fun that has always characterized minor league baseball meant wacky promotions and being able to sit close to the field. It gives a sense of closeness and intimacy in contrast to attending a Major League game that has an air of reverence. Sort of like comparing your friend’s backyard barbeque to corporate sponsored tailgate. Both are fun but feel radically different.

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A beautiful night for baseball at Whitaker Bank Ballpark. (The Winning Run/DJ)

P.J. Colon of the Columbia Fireflies started for the South team. Colon was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland and grew up in California. There are not many baseball players to come from Europe, much less Northern Ireland, so those who do are key to continuing the international growth of the game. Opposing Colon was the North team’s starter, Mitch Keller of the West Virginia Power. Keller would earn the victory and Colon would receive the loss as Max Schrock of the Hagerstown Suns drove in the first of his two RBI during the first inning. Schrock won the MVP award by finishing the game 2 for 3, with 2 RBI and a double.

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Baseball is better with family, especially the soon to be sister-in-law. (The Winning Run/ KCL)

Baseball can be a fickle sport. Most likely not every player on the field during the All Star game will reach the Major Leagues. Seeing talent that is making its way through the Minor Leagues towards MLB is exciting. Although these players are still developing, you can already see how they will help propel the game forward. The next great star is not simple to spot, but on that field were the potential MLB All Star players of the future who will delight fans for years to come. I have seen the future of baseball, and it is good.

DJ

Restoring Old Leather…Part 3

This is a three-part series on how I’ve come to recapture my love for America’s favorite pastime.

So it’s been nearly two decades since I paid careful attention to baseball. When I was working in financials before the 2008 crisis, I would get the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post daily. I’d save the sports sections for my lunch break and read some highlights and box scores over coffee and cigarettes. That’s the most I would do and I was certainly more engrossed in football (college, pro, and the sport that’s called football by the rest of the world), even to the exclusion of other sports.

Some of you may have already done the math and realized that I was hardly paying attention to baseball during an important time. The creation of the “Evil Empire” of the Yankees dominating the late 90s and early 00s that led to, for me, a heartbreaking moment of witnessing the end to the Curse of the Bambino.  The Yankees letting the Boston (sorry, I’m still enough of a Yankees fan that I’m not going to type their entire name) Red $%# make history by being the first team to ever come back from a 3 game deficit to win the ALCS. I also remember bits and pieces of the Subway Series, mostly because I saved a magazine issue that ran a story about it. 33% of the championships for a 15 year span for the Yankees. I wasn’t alive the last time another team in baseball could make a boast like this. Instead, I was spending most of those years studying, watching football, and guzzling beer.

The Yankees will always be the Evil Empire. (www.thegreedypinstripes.com)

The Yankees will always be the Evil Empire. (www.thegreedypinstripes.com)

The market crash taught me an interesting lesson about the notion of value. It’s an idea that’s tossed around often. Frequently interchangeable with words like price, cost, worth…but ultimately misunderstood. I started questioning what I valued. When the Yankees won the World Series again in 2009, I wasn’t paying much attention to sports at all but I watched some of the games. I always loved watching Mariano Rivera close games and he will probably forever remain my favorite Yankee of all time. But this time around, it was different. The thrill was gone…I had misplaced my values.

I’ve worked in education where I’ve taught children of all ages. I’ve taught the self-discipline and techniques of martial arts to kids as young as four and had the pleasure to watch them become fine teenagers and young adults. I’ve helped kids talk to their parents about problems and helped parents figure out how to give their kids the needed direction to straighten them out. I still have a little paper helicopter figurine an ingenious little 4th grader made me one day because he was so excited that I, an Asian man, was his substitute teacher. On the last day of a five month teaching assignment for an elementary school music teacher, the entire third grade class marched through the halls with handmade cards, placed them in a basket by my door, and gave me a hug.

I worked in the financial industry as a mortgage trader working with non-securitized whole loan packages. The sort of toxic assets that weren’t supposed to be packaged in those CDOs (Collateralized Debt Obligation) that spooked the market and brought it crashing down in 2008. Don’t blame me, I know guys that were willing to buy those things off the big banks who wouldn’t admit to the losses they needed to take. Forget supply and demand, the sky was falling. Sellers felt like what they had was worth more than the price they were hearing from the buyers – worthless.

The 2008 crash hit nearly everyone, and hard. (www.theamericangenius.com)

The 2008 crash hit nearly everyone, and hard. (www.theamericangenius.com)

I pretty much lost my shirt over the financial crisis and the rate I was paid to be a substitute teacher was nice while I was working except, when spread out over the year, I wasn’t making enough to get out of my mom’s house. We live in a social world, full of human interactions. Some of these interactions are emotionally fulfilling relationships that may be called friendship. Others involve exchanges in goods and labor and the relationship is labeled as business. They usually mix as well as bleach and ammonia.

There’s a really great book about human behavior called Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely. If you read the excerpt I linked to, you’ll see how baseball has this element where social norms clash with market transactions in a variety of ways. If the Nationals really consider me part of their “family” and care about me, why do they charge so much (or at all) for their games and concessions? Anyway, it made me think about the human element to sports, the language we use to describe the game, the minor league system, and so much more. I’ve come to find that baseball is a fantastic analogue for life. You may want to argue that all sports are analogues to the struggle that is life. If sports are a reflection our lives and society, then I would argue that we should try to live a baseball life over any other.

Baseball has been quite reluctant to adopt instant replay to correct calls. The human element of umpiring is part and parcel of the game. We may not agree with an umpire’s strike zone but we often forget that baseball players come in various heights. So imagine…

Eddie Gaedel's strike zone was almost non-existent. (www.sportingcharts.com)

Eddie Gaedel’s strike zone was almost non-existent. (www.sportingcharts.com)

Is Fister really adjusting to a different strike zone? When Ramos frames the pitch down is it less believable because Altuve’s chest is about half a foot lower than Marisnick’s? Even though the ump is supposed to consider a number of things, don’t we just care about consistency? That’s the human element, the X-factor that requires the personal touch making every game just a little different.

George Carlin had an amazing part to his act where he compared baseball to football. Although I think he may have been more of a football fan than a baseball fan, I think the comparison still holds today. It also makes you think about what we value and how we place value on things. Kid acts out in class. Is it an error? Or a penalty? I suppose what I want to everyone to ask themselves is that if life is such a battle, how do we win? Is tearing down another a worthwhile act to win? What if we helped each other avoid making errors? Would this world be a better place?

Baseball is a celebration of quirks and history. If it weren’t for baseball fanatics creating the Rotisserie League, would we even have fantasy sports leagues? Fantasy is one of those ways that I’ve come back into following players and teams. A way to keep my interest going and fill out my knowledge of the game the way I used to trying to memorize the stats on baseball cards. I came back to this sport because we can all use a bit more celebration in our lives. I hope you’ve enjoyed reminiscing with me and exploring the ways that life applies to baseball. Let me know what you think and let’s discuss this beautiful game.

BL @BHGLee

Baseball Tour 2013

 

There is nothing better than watching a baseball game in person. The crack of the bat, the pop of the glove, the smell of the field, the taste of the hot dogs. It all makes for a great time watching a ball game. In 2013, my brother and myself had the opportunity to watch a game in several different ball parks. Some were large Major League stadiums, some were minor league or independent league stadiums, others were fields where kids get to play the game they love. Enjoy the tour of our 2013 baseball season.

Gwinnett County Parks’ Special Needs Field

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Grizzly Baseball Complex, home of the Georgia Gwinnet College Grizzlies. NAIA collegiate school. 

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CMC-NorthEast Stadium, home of the Kannapolis Intimidators. Single-A affiliate of the Chicago White Sox.

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BB&T Ballpark, home of the Charlotte Knights. Triple-A affiliates of the Chicago White Sox.

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PNC Park, home of the Pittsburgh Pirates.

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Turner Field, home of the Atlanta Braves.

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Coolray Field, home of the Gwinnett Braves. Best seats in the house. Triple-A affiliate of the Atlanta Braves.   

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Joe W. Davis Stadium, home of the Huntsville Stars. Double-A affiliate of the Milwaukee Brewers. Image

Howard Johnson Field at Cardinal Park, home of the Johnson City Cardinals. Rookie League affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals. 

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Fluor Field at the West End, home of the Greenville Drive. Single-A affiliate of the Boston Red Sox. 

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Joseph L. Bruno Stadium, home of the Tri-City Valley Cats. Single-A Short Season affiliate of the Houston Astros. 

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Tropicana Field, home of the Tampa Bay Rays.

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Bears & Eagle Riverfront Stadium, home of the Newark Bears. Cam-Am League game.   

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Yankee Stadium, home of New York Yankees. Watching Mariano Rivera pitch against the San Francisco Giants.   

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Citi Field, home of the New York Mets.

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Rogers Centre, home of the Toronto Blue Jays. 

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Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox. Memorial Day weekend.  

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Each of these stadiums has its own unique feel to it and make the experience of watching a game at its field special. Hopefully the 2014 season will allow us to attend a game at more stadiums and enjoy a day at the ball park.

D