Tagged: Cal Ripken Jr.

The Glove

Ozzie Smith was a wizard with the glove, he could do everything on the field defensively. The same could be said for Omar Vizquel. If it was possible defensively, one or both of these men could do it on a baseball diamond. The impossible dive, catch, or throw; they could do it all. Andrelton Simmons seems to have taken up their torch. Simmons is only in his sixth season, yet he is already drawing comparisons to these legendary players.

Omar Vizquel played for six teams during his 24 year career, all in the American League except a four year stint with the Giants. A magician with the glove, Vizquel ranks first in career games played at shortstop, fourth in career dWAR, appeared in three All Star games, and won 11 Gold Gloves. Beginning in 1993, Vizquel won the American League Gold Glove for shortstop every year until 2001. His defensive dominance continued late into his career, as he won his 11th and final Gold Glove as a 39 year old shortstop for the Giants in 2006.

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Ozzie Smith was fearless with a glove in his hand. (www.si.com)

Ozzie Smith played for the Padres and the Cardinals during his 19 year career. The Wizard ranks fourth in career games at shortstop, first in career dWAR, appeared in 15 All Star games, and won consecutive 13 Gold Gloves. He is the only player to win a National League Gold Glove at shortstop in the 1980s, winning every year from 1980 until 1992.

Vizquel and Smith were the premier defensive shortstops from 1989 to 1996; collectively winning eight of the 16 Gold Gloves awarded by Major League Baseball. Two men, two leagues, winning half of all Gold Gloves.

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Omar Vizquel could do it all with the glove.  (www.mlb.com/indians)

The absurd defensive capabilities of both Vizquel and Smith did not translate into hitting prowess. They each hit .300 or better only once in their careers. Vizquel and Smith were the traditional light hitting shortstop that rarely exists in baseball today. Every player is expected to help the team offensively, even defensive legends. The offensive ability of Andrelton Simmons could be what separates him from the two legends he resembles defensively.

Watching Simmons play shortstop is like watching an unscripted ballet. Every night he does something amazing. A throw that catches a sleeping runner. A dive to stop a ball getting to the outfield, thus stopping a runner from grabbing another bag. A catch that normally would fall in for a base hit. Every batter knows they have to hustle on any ball in the infield because Simmons can appear out of nowhere to field the ball and unleash his cannon arm to take another hit away. If Omar Vizquel was a magician and Ozzie Smith was the Wizard, let’s call Andrelton Simmons a sorcerer.

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Andrelton Simmons will leave you speechless with his glove every night, and could become the greatest shortstop ever. (AP/ Mark J. Terrill)

Simmons is only 27 years old, his peak years should be ahead of him. This season he is breaking out offensively, as he is on pace to set career highs in Plate Appearances, Home Runs, Batting Average, On-Base Percentage, Slugging Percentage, On-Base Plus Slugging, Total Bases, Defensive Innings and Errors. (Defensive errors can be a sign of greater range or instincts, thus reaching more balls and creating more chances to make a play. The more chances the more opportunity for mistakes. More aggressive defense does have ceiling however.) He has already set career highs in Hits, Doubles, Walks, RBI, Stolen Bases, and Sacrifice Flies, and we have a few more weeks left in the season.

No one is under any illusion that Simmons is the next slugging shortstop, like Alex Rodriguez or Cal Ripken Jr. He is rather a once in a generation defensive player. If he continues to improve offensively, while retaining his defensive skills, he should enjoy a long career. He has the skills with the glove to become the greatest shortstop to ever field the position. Improving his ability with the bat could put Andrelton Simmons in the conversation for the greatest shortstop ever.

DJ

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Saving the Game

20 years ago today Cal Ripken Jr. helped to reenergize baseball, by doing what he did best, showing up for work.  The Iran Man’s chase of the Iron Horse resonated with fans who had lost faith in the game during the 1994 Players Strike.  Ripken was not performing a superhuman feat, he was simply doing his job like the fans who fill the seats at every Major League Baseball stadium during every game of the season.  Ripken brought baseball and the fans back together.

The 1994 Players Strike was generally about money.  The argument was between the owners and players, millionaire owners fighting against players who were millionaires or who could become millionaires.  This in fighting did not sit well with the fans who were seeing the cost of attending a game continue to rise, and who felt the rising prices were slowly pushing them away from the game.  The Major League Baseball Players Association wanted a larger piece of the financial pie the game generated, and the owners did not want to share.  Not getting lost in the argument, the disagreement and the lack of a new Collective Bargaining Agreement led to the players going out on strike on August 11, 1994.  The strike would last 232 days, finally ending on April 2, 1995.  The 1994 season ended without the completion of the full 162 game schedule.  There were no playoffs, there was no World Series, there was no parade for a World Series champion.  The 1994 season never concluded, it only stopped.

Cal Ripken Jr. always showed up for work. (www.porter-binks.photoshelter.com)

Cal Ripken Jr. always showed up for work. (www.porter-binks.photoshelter.com)

Baseball fans were angry.  The game had seemingly forgotten its roots; it was no longer a game but a business.  While the financial and business issues were resolved, the damage done to the game seemed to have forever changed the game, and not for the better.  Baseball had angered the people it depended on for its very existence, the fans.  Repairing the damage inflicted from the Strike looked as though it could take years or even a generation to repair, if it was ever going to be able to be repaired.  However, baseball was able to repair some of the damage and reengage the fans thanks to what started on May 30, 1982.

On Sunday May 30, 1982 the Baltimore Orioles lost to the Toronto Blue Jays 6-0 at Memorial Stadium in Baltimore before a paid attendance of 21,632.  The Orioles collected only one hit that day, a fifth inning single to left by catcher Rick Dempsey.  Batting 8th, behind Dempsey was third baseman Cal Ripken Jr.  Ripken went 0 for 2 with a walk. This otherwise forgettable game was game 1 of 2,632 consecutive that Ripken would play.  

Fast forward more than 2,000 games and the start of the delayed 1995 Major League season.  Every day Ripken grew closer to the magical 2,130 consecutive games played record set by Hall of Fame player Lou Gehrig.  The Iron Horse was pure baseball.  He was a great hitter, a great slugger, and a gracious man.  When ALS took away his gift to play the game he did not make a public scene about how bad his luck was, he did not he draw attention to himself.  The media speculation swirled about what was wrong with Gehrig, but he never took part in the circus.  Instead, he quietly and with dignity stepped aside so as to not hurt the team.  When the Yankees held Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day on July 4, 1939 the dignity and grace with which Gehrig carried himself was on full display.  Addressing the sold out crowd, Gehrig spoke of the people who he was lucky to know, his family, and how lucky he was.  Lou Gehrig was more than a ball player; he was a man, he was class, he was grace.  

Lou Gehrig played 2,130 consecutive games in which he terrorized opposing teams before ALS forced him to stop. (www.mlbreports.com)

Lou Gehrig played 2,130 consecutive games in which he terrorized opposing teams before ALS forced him to stop. (www.mlbreports.com)

Class.  Dignity.  Grace.  These were the qualities baseball needed in 1995.  These are the qualities Cal Ripken Jr. put on display every day.  Baseball observers and fans can appreciate a player who is chasing .400, chasing Dimaggio’s 56 game hit streak, chasing the multitude of records that elevate a player above his contemporaries and places him among the greats.  While these pursuits are great, they were not the pursuit that would galvanize people to return to baseball in 1995.  Baseball needed someone and something the people watching in the stadium, on television, or listening on the radio could relate to.  They could all relate to the consecutive game streak.  

Those of use that have not been blessed with the athletic gifts necessary to play sports on the highest level do not have off seasons.  Every morning we wake up and go to work.  We put in an honest day’s work for an honest day’s pay, and then we do it all over again tomorrow.  This is the rhythm of life.  It is a grind, you show up and work at it.  You may not be the best, you may be a compiler.  Every day working on your craft, getting a little closer to your potential, even if that potential does not place you among the elites of your chosen field.  Cal Ripken Jr. is not the greatest baseball player to take the field.  He was an excellent player and a compiler.  He had flaws in his game, but he showed up everyday and worked at correcting those flaws.  Simply showing up for work resonated with people, they could relate with Ripken and felt he understood what it was like for them to show up to work when they did not feel well or when they had the aches and pains that go along with life.  Ripken reminded people why baseball mattered to them personally again.  He helped to bridge the gap and overcome the anger and animosity that grew out of the Strike.  

Cal Ripken Jr. helped bring the fans back to baseball. (www.baseballessentials.com)

Cal Ripken Jr. helped bring the fans back to baseball. (www.baseballessentials.com)

September 6, 1995 marked the 2,131st game the Baltimore Orioles had played since that Sunday afternoon in 1982.  Cal Ripken Jr. had come to work sick, injured, healthy, stressed, happy, and sad but most of all he had shown up to work every day and had done his job.  On a Wednesday night in Baltimore at Camden Yards, the Iron Man pass the Iron Horse.  The Orioles won 4-2 over the California Angels and Ripken went 2 for 4 with a solo home run that night, but it did not matter.  What mattered was the joy in the stadium, the joy in seeing a player achieve something that had no short cut, no dollar sign, no superhuman feat.  Simply Cal Ripken Jr. showed up to work, again.  

The memories from the night are plenty.  The standing ovation for Ripken that seemed to last forever.  The announcers on television understanding that words were not necessary.  The Orioles players pushing a reluctant, and almost embarrassed Ripken out of the dugout to take a victory lap around the field.  Everyone, fans, umpires, opposing players, and teammates applauding Ripken’s accomplishment.  Cal Ripken Jr. helped to save the game of baseball that September night.  He showed baseball fans that the game had not been ruined by the money and the business, it still was a children’s game played by adults.  He showed the players and owners that the game does not belong to them, it belongs to the fans.  

Baseball and life are a grind.  You show up every day working towards a perfection that is impossible to reach.  You show up because it is your job to put in an honest days work to receive and honest days pay.  Cal Ripken Jr. saved the game of baseball by reminded all of us this 20 years ago.
DJ

Hall of Famer of the Week- Ty Cobb

Born on September 11, 1886 in Narrows, Georgia, Ty Cobb would become one of the greatest players in baseball history.  During his 24 year playing career, 22 with the Detroit Tigers and two with the Philadelphia Athletics, Cobb hit over .300 23 times.  His rookie year in 1905, Cobb hit .240 in 150 at bats, however he would never hit below .316 (his second season) again for the rest of his career.  His .367 career batting average remains a Major League record, which is unlikely to be surpassed.  He hit over .400 three times during his career (1911-.420, 1912-.409, and 1922-.401).  Remarkably Cobb did not win the batting title in 1922, as George Sisler hit .420 for the St. Louis Browns.  In 1909, Cobb won the Triple Crown leading the American League with a .377 batting average, 9 home runs, and 107 RBI.  The 1911 season was one of Cobb’s best seasons, and arguably one of the greatest of all time.  Cobb hit .420, collected 248 hits, 47 doubles, 24 triples, 127 RBI, scored 147 runs, 83 stolen bases, SLG .621, and OPS 1.088; all of which led the American League.  Cobb’s efforts earned him the Chalmers Award, the precursor to the MVP.

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The legendary tales of Cobb sharpening his spikes to intimidate others shows how intense of a competitor Cobb was on the field.  Cobb knew the strike zone as well as any hitter to have ever played the game.  He had only 680 strikeouts during his career, striking out over 50 times in a season only once.  His incredible plate discipline along with his speed on the base path presented a major problem to opposing teams.  Cobb was almost sure to make contact with any pitch, which made the hit and run play possible any time a runner was on base.  If the defense tried to prevent the runner from advancing, Cobb could hit the ball to foil the defenses plans.  Once he was on base, Cobb could distract the pitcher from the hitter.  Few, if any, infielders wanted to get in his way as he advanced around the bases for fear of injury from his spikes.  Cobb had 898 stolen bases during his career.  It was nearly impossible to keep Cobb off the bases and once he was there between his speed and intelligence opponents were unlikely to get him out.

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Cobb’s fierce nature on the field was unsurpassed during his playing career, most notably with his high spikes.  However, Cobb’s intensity extended beyond the field, as in 1912 he went into the stands in New York while playing the Highlanders and beat a man after the fan hurled insults at Cobb during a game.

Away from the baseball field Cobb was a shrewd investor, investing heavily in Coca Cola during its early years.  He was also a generous man, and his generosity off the field continues to be felt today.  Cobb founded the Ty Cobb Educational foundation, which has helped thousands of Georgia students to attend college by awarding scholarships.  To date, more than thirteen million dollars have been awarded to students.  Cobb also established the Cobb Memorial Hospital in 1950.  This hospital has become the Ty Cobb Healthcare System which continues to serve rural areas of Northwest Georgia.

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Cobb was a member of the inaugural class inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936.  He received 222 out of 226 votes.  He received more votes than the other members of the 1936 class: Honus Wagner (215), Babe Ruth (215), Christy Mathewson (205), and Walter Johnson (189).  Cobb earned the honor of being the first inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame.  This honor was bestowed upon him as he received the highest vote total among those in the first class in 1936.  Cobb’s 98.23% of the Voting for the Hall of Fame remains the fourth best all time, behind only Tom Seaver (98.84%), Nolan Ryan (98.79%), and Cal Ripken Jr. (98.53%).

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