Tagged: TBS

Blackout Rules Apply

The playoffs are when the best from every sport is on full display. The best teams play each other, which often leads to games full of drama that only further entices new fans to continue watching. Unfortunately Major League Baseball has hidden some of the best games of the year from many fans in how it broadcasts the playoffs. Avid fans miss out on great games, but baseball also misses the opportunity to draw in new fans as the majority of games before the World Series are broadcast on cable networks.

The airing of playoff baseball on TBS, Fox Sports 1, the MLB Network, and ESPN has shut out many people from watching great baseball. Yes, plenty of people have access to all or some of these channels to watch the games, but those who do not have to make a choice. They can find a radio station broadcasting the game (personally I love listening to baseball on the radio), go to a restaurant, bar, or friend’s house that is showing the game, or generally miss out except for updates. Going out several nights a week for a few weeks gets expensive quickly, thus pricing many more people out, thus radio or the updates are the most likely options for many people. I am fully aware, as I have stated many times, baseball is a business. Major League Baseball signed contracts with these broadcasters for enormous sums of money for the rights to these games. However, there needs to be a balance between television revenue and making the best weeks on the baseball calendar available to all fans. Broadcasters like ABC (which owns ESPN), NBC, and CBS might have passed on the rights to broadcast playoff baseball. Fox will once again broadcast the World Series, yet it is a shame that for some they will not see a single game of baseball on television from the last day of the regular season until Game 1 of the World Series.

tv-blackout

Major League Baseball continuously stresses the importance of growing the game, reaching a younger and more diverse audience. Reaching out through promotions like Players Weekend, programs like RBI (Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities), and highlighting some of the best players like Bryce Harper, Clayton Kershaw, and Jose Altuve are great, but Major League Baseball hurts its own efforts to reach a larger audience by hiding the playoffs from those who choose to not have cable or satellite television and/or those who cannot afford it. If I can only watch sports on the basic channels and the majority of the games I see are football, why would I wait for weeks to see a few games at the end of October when the NFL season is in full swing? Even during the regular season the availability of baseball games is rather spartan.

Major League Baseball has signed contracts with broadcasters and for now can do little to change how the playoffs are broadcast. However, at the end of these contracts a hard look must be taken at whether only premium channels get the games before the World Series is the best for the future of the sport. Major League Baseball should be paid handsomely for the product it provides to broadcasters, but there could be a middle ground where baseball is paid well, yet does not shut out many fans and potential fans from the best games of the year. Baseball needs to be the sport of everyone, not just those that can afford television packages. No one likes blackout rules.

DJ

Skip and Pete

The Professor is gone.  Pete Van Wieren recently passed away after a long battle with cancer.  I love baseball, and the death of Tony Gwynn was sad for everyone associated with baseball in any manner.  However, the death of Pete Van Wieren hit home for me and made me genuinely sad.  Just as Braves fans were celebrating the inductions of Bobby Cox, Greg Maddux, and Tom Glavine into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, they were hit with the news of Van Wieren’s passing.  Each one connects back to the run of 14 straight division titles for the Braves.  As a kid growing up in suburban Atlanta they were all a part of my childhood. 

Listening to Cox cheer on the players or get in the face of an umpire to protect one of his players.  Watching Maddux and Glavine pick apart opposing batters, often getting borderline calls which other pitchers with less impressive resumes would not get.  Through it all there were Skip Caray and Pete Van Wieren calling the games.  These men were the voices of my obsession with baseball when I was growing up.  The nasally voice of Caray with his one liners, countered perfectly with the precise information of Van Wieren.  They were amazing on their own, but together they were golden. 

Pete Van Wieren (www.grhof.com)

Pete Van Wieren (www.grhof.com)

 

I have no doubt that both Skip and Pete had their faults but to a boy so in love with baseball and rooting hard for the Braves every night, they were saints.  Every team has their own voices. Some even share these voices with the rest of baseball.  The Dodgers share Vin Scully, the Tigers shared Ernie Harwell, the Cardinals shared Jack Buck, the White Sox share Hawk Harrelson, and the list goes on.  However, Skip and Pete always seemed to not garner the same national recognition as the others, despite the Braves being on television nationally nearly every night thanks to owner Ted Turner and TBS.  I have personally met die hard Braves fans from Rochester, New York (Van Wieren’s hometown), Billings, Montana, and other cities which should be far outside the reach of the Braves.  In some way this has made me love Skip and Pete even more, they were the Braves treasure to enjoy.  We did not have to share them with the rest of baseball, they were ours. 

Game 7 of the 1992 NLCS is the proof that Skip and Pete were ours.  The call by the national broadcasters is as foreign to me as speaking Russian.  However listening to Skip and Pete call the game continues to give me Goosebumps.  Skip talking about “alotta room in right center” and Sid Bream’s mad dash home from second on Francisco Cabrera’s single to left field and Barry Bonds’ throw being too late.  I had just turned six when that play happened but I can remember jumping up and down then and when Marquis Grissom caught the final out of the 1995 World Series.  These calls by Skip and Pete will forever be the sound track of my childhood.   

Skip Caray (twonateshow.wordpress.com)

Skip Caray (twonateshow.wordpress.com)

Every broadcast for the Braves with Skip and Pete began the exact same way.  The camera would come on in the broadcast booth and Skip would say “Hello everybody”.  It always made you feel like he was talking to you and your family.  In the same way in which Red Barber, Jon Miller, and Tim McCarver in my mind have a full name because they are broadcasters, Skip and Pete only have one name each because they are family.  They were not working, they were simply telling you what was happening in their opinion, often times with a pro-Braves slant because they too were cheering for the Braves.  Most people want a neutral announcer, not me, I want someone who will celebrate an important win or be angry when an umpire blows a call or will laugh when a player does something funny.  I want to watch the game with family and friends and this is exactly what Skip and Pete gave you and me every night. 

Skip carried on the family business from his father Harry Caray, while he could be just as entertaining as his father, he could also be serious in his own manner.  This has passed on to his own son Chip Caray, who broadcast with the Cubs for a while but has found a home with the Braves now.  Chip is his own man but you can definitely tell there is Carey blood in him. 

Pete sought to change his family name, as chronicled in his autobiography Of Mikes and Men.  His father abandoned him and his mother when he was young, so he sought to reclaim the dignity of the Van Wieren name.  I view Vin Scully as a grandfather figure, Harry Caray as the fun uncle, Bob Uecker as the crazy cousin, Skip as the wisecracking older brother, and Pete as the smart friend who never ceases to amaze you with his vast knowledge of the game and his humility.  You will be missed by me and everyone who ever heard you call a game, and you played such an important role in my life and the lives of thousands of others who you never met.  Job well done Pete and thank you.

D