Tagged: Strike

Love and WAR

Valentine’s Day is about spending time with that special someone in your life. You express your love with gifts, flowers, candies, a nice meal, or simply spending time together. Winning builds love in baseball, it solves every team’s problems. Yankee owner George Steinbrenner hated losing, “Winning is the most important thing in my life, after breathing. Breathing first, winning next.” So what creates more love, winning, in baseball? WAR.

WAR, Wins Above Replacement, measures a player’s value in all facets of the game by deciphering how many more wins he’s worth than a replacement-level player at his same position. The higher a player’s WAR the more they help the team.

The highest career WAR for any Major Leaguer born on Valentine’s Day belongs to Charles “Pretzels” Getzien. Born in Germany on February 14, 1864, Getzien played for five teams during his nine seasons in the National League. Nicknamed Pretzels for throwing a double curve ball, Getzien’s career 18.1 WAR far outpaces his closest competitor Arthur Irwin’s career 15.2 WAR. Even Candy LaChance’s career 11.1 WAR was no match for Getzien.

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Charles “Pretzels” Getzien while with the Detroit Wolverines. (Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs)

Baseball in the 1880’s and early 1890’s was not the same game played today. Getzien, a starting pitcher, was expected to pitch every few days; teams did not use the modern five man rotation. Starters were expected to pitch the entire game; pitch counts did not matter. Bullpen matchups in high leverage situations were never a thought. In 1884, Getzien’s first season in the National League, it took six balls to walk a batter, not the modern four. There were other rule changes along the way.

1886 was Pretzels Getzien’s best season. He started 43 games for the Detroit Wolverines, pitching 42 Complete Games, and 1 Shutout. His 30-11 record included a 3.03 ERA and 1.223 WHIP. Getzien pitched 386.2 innings, allowing 388 Hits, 203 Runs, just 130 Earned Runs, 6 Home Runs, striking out 172, walking 85, and throwing 19 Wild Pitches. At the plate, he hit .176 in 165 At Bats, collecting 29 Hits, 3 Doubles, 3 Triples, 19 RBI, 3 Stolen Bases, scoring 14 Runs, 6 walks, 46 strikeouts, for an .205 On-Base Percentage, Slugging .230, and .435 OPS. Getzien’s 1886 season was the first of five consecutive seasons with at least 40 starts.

More rule changes occurred before the 1887 season. Batters could no longer call for high or low pitches. Five balls were required to walk a batter, not six. Striking out a batter required four strikes. Bats could have one flat side. While the rules changed Getzien’s success remained. He was the only Wolverine starter to make more than 24 starts, starting 42 with 41 Complete Games. Riding Getzien’s right arm, Detroit won the National League Pennant. They faced the American Association champion St. Louis Browns in the World Series. Pretzels Getzien went 4-2, throwing 6 Complete Games, 58 innings, with a 2.48 ERA and 1.310 WHIP. He allowed 61 Hits, 23 Runs, 16 Earned Runs, walked 15, and struck out 17. Getzien was a threat at the plate too. He hit .300 in 20 At Bats, collecting 6 hits, including 2 Doubles, 1 stolen base, scoring 5 Runs, 2 RBI, 3 walks, and 6 strikeouts. He boasted a .391 On-Base Percentage, .400 Slugging, and .791 OPS. The Wolverines won the series 10 games to five.

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The 1887 World Series Champions, Detroit Wolverines. (www.detroitathletic.com)

In 1888, Getzien started 46 games throwing 45 Complete Games. The Wolverines pitching staff also had Pete Conway, 45 starts, and Henry Gruber, 25 starts. Despite the team’s success Detroit owner Frederick Stearns disbanded the Wolverines after the season due to financial woes. Getzien joined the Indianapolis Hoosiers for the 1889 season. Prior to the season, the National League adopted the modern four balls for a walk and three strikes for a strikeout rule. Getzien started 44 games, throwing 36 Complete Games. After one season with the Hoosiers, Getzien spent 1890, his last great season, pitching for the Boston Beaneaters. He made 40 starts, throwing 39 Complete Games alongside future Hall of Famers Kid Nichols and John Clarkson. Nichols, a rookie, threw a Complete Game in all 47 of his starts. Clarkson made 44 starts with 43 Complete Games. Getzien’s pitching career began to decline after 1890.

Getzien started nine games for Boston in 1891 before he was released. He would sign with the Cleveland Spiders and pitch just one game. Getzien finished his career with the St. Louis Browns in 1892. It was the only season of his career where batters were forced to hit a round ball with a round bat squarely; bats could no longer have a flat side.

In 1893, Getzien’s first season out of professional baseball, saw the pitching distance moved from 50 feet to 60 feet, 6 inches. The rules governing baseball in the 1800’s shed light on the games’ differences in its infancy and today. In 1901, almost a decade after Pretzels Getzien last pitched, the National League would count foul balls as strikes. Previously if a batter fouled off seven consecutive pitches to begin an at bat the count remained no balls and no strikes. Striking out a batter required a swing and miss or a called strike.

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Pretzels Getzien as a member of the Detroit Wolverines in 1888. (Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs)

Getzien compiled a career record of 145-139, 1 Save, 3.46 ERA, and 1.288 WHIP. He started 296 games, throwing 277 Complete Games, and 11 shutouts. In 2,539.2 innings, Getzien allowed 2,670 hits, 1,555 runs, 976 Earned Runs, struck out 1,070, walked 602, hit 28 batters, and threw 111 Wild Pitches. He is the all-time leader in Wins, Loses, Complete Games, Shutouts, Innings Pitched, Hits Allowed, Runs, Earned Runs, Wild Pitches, and Batters Faced for German born Major Leaguers. Getzien led the National League in Home Runs allowed in 1887 and 1889, with 24 and 27 respectively. In an era of few home runs Getzien allowed more Home Runs than many modern day pitchers. He allowed 6.2% of the 383 Home Runs hit in 1887 and 7.2% of the 371 hit in 1889. In 2018, Tyler Anderson of the Rockies and Chase Anderson of the Brewers led the National League with 30 Home Runs allowed. They both allowed 1.1% of the 2,685 Home Runs hit.

Offensively, Getzien had 1,140 Plate Appearances, 1,056 At Bats, collecting 209 Hits, 27 Doubles, 15 Triples, 8 Home Runs, 109 RBI, 17 Stolen Bases, 78 Walks, 247 Strike Outs, .198 Batting Average, .257 On-Base Percentage, .275 Slugging, and .532 OPS. His pitching, not hitting, abilities made him dangerous on the diamond.

Pretzels Getzien is most remembered for his odd nickname. On his 155th Birthday, let us remember him as the career WAR leader for Major Leaguers born on Valentine’s Day. So in his honor, may the love of your life be kind like the warm sunshine and green grass of the coming baseball season. Happy Valentine’s Day, WAR can create love.

DJ

Saving the Game

20 years ago today Cal Ripken Jr. helped to reenergize baseball, by doing what he did best, showing up for work.  The Iran Man’s chase of the Iron Horse resonated with fans who had lost faith in the game during the 1994 Players Strike.  Ripken was not performing a superhuman feat, he was simply doing his job like the fans who fill the seats at every Major League Baseball stadium during every game of the season.  Ripken brought baseball and the fans back together.

The 1994 Players Strike was generally about money.  The argument was between the owners and players, millionaire owners fighting against players who were millionaires or who could become millionaires.  This in fighting did not sit well with the fans who were seeing the cost of attending a game continue to rise, and who felt the rising prices were slowly pushing them away from the game.  The Major League Baseball Players Association wanted a larger piece of the financial pie the game generated, and the owners did not want to share.  Not getting lost in the argument, the disagreement and the lack of a new Collective Bargaining Agreement led to the players going out on strike on August 11, 1994.  The strike would last 232 days, finally ending on April 2, 1995.  The 1994 season ended without the completion of the full 162 game schedule.  There were no playoffs, there was no World Series, there was no parade for a World Series champion.  The 1994 season never concluded, it only stopped.

Cal Ripken Jr. always showed up for work. (www.porter-binks.photoshelter.com)

Cal Ripken Jr. always showed up for work. (www.porter-binks.photoshelter.com)

Baseball fans were angry.  The game had seemingly forgotten its roots; it was no longer a game but a business.  While the financial and business issues were resolved, the damage done to the game seemed to have forever changed the game, and not for the better.  Baseball had angered the people it depended on for its very existence, the fans.  Repairing the damage inflicted from the Strike looked as though it could take years or even a generation to repair, if it was ever going to be able to be repaired.  However, baseball was able to repair some of the damage and reengage the fans thanks to what started on May 30, 1982.

On Sunday May 30, 1982 the Baltimore Orioles lost to the Toronto Blue Jays 6-0 at Memorial Stadium in Baltimore before a paid attendance of 21,632.  The Orioles collected only one hit that day, a fifth inning single to left by catcher Rick Dempsey.  Batting 8th, behind Dempsey was third baseman Cal Ripken Jr.  Ripken went 0 for 2 with a walk. This otherwise forgettable game was game 1 of 2,632 consecutive that Ripken would play.  

Fast forward more than 2,000 games and the start of the delayed 1995 Major League season.  Every day Ripken grew closer to the magical 2,130 consecutive games played record set by Hall of Fame player Lou Gehrig.  The Iron Horse was pure baseball.  He was a great hitter, a great slugger, and a gracious man.  When ALS took away his gift to play the game he did not make a public scene about how bad his luck was, he did not he draw attention to himself.  The media speculation swirled about what was wrong with Gehrig, but he never took part in the circus.  Instead, he quietly and with dignity stepped aside so as to not hurt the team.  When the Yankees held Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day on July 4, 1939 the dignity and grace with which Gehrig carried himself was on full display.  Addressing the sold out crowd, Gehrig spoke of the people who he was lucky to know, his family, and how lucky he was.  Lou Gehrig was more than a ball player; he was a man, he was class, he was grace.  

Lou Gehrig played 2,130 consecutive games in which he terrorized opposing teams before ALS forced him to stop. (www.mlbreports.com)

Lou Gehrig played 2,130 consecutive games in which he terrorized opposing teams before ALS forced him to stop. (www.mlbreports.com)

Class.  Dignity.  Grace.  These were the qualities baseball needed in 1995.  These are the qualities Cal Ripken Jr. put on display every day.  Baseball observers and fans can appreciate a player who is chasing .400, chasing Dimaggio’s 56 game hit streak, chasing the multitude of records that elevate a player above his contemporaries and places him among the greats.  While these pursuits are great, they were not the pursuit that would galvanize people to return to baseball in 1995.  Baseball needed someone and something the people watching in the stadium, on television, or listening on the radio could relate to.  They could all relate to the consecutive game streak.  

Those of use that have not been blessed with the athletic gifts necessary to play sports on the highest level do not have off seasons.  Every morning we wake up and go to work.  We put in an honest day’s work for an honest day’s pay, and then we do it all over again tomorrow.  This is the rhythm of life.  It is a grind, you show up and work at it.  You may not be the best, you may be a compiler.  Every day working on your craft, getting a little closer to your potential, even if that potential does not place you among the elites of your chosen field.  Cal Ripken Jr. is not the greatest baseball player to take the field.  He was an excellent player and a compiler.  He had flaws in his game, but he showed up everyday and worked at correcting those flaws.  Simply showing up for work resonated with people, they could relate with Ripken and felt he understood what it was like for them to show up to work when they did not feel well or when they had the aches and pains that go along with life.  Ripken reminded people why baseball mattered to them personally again.  He helped to bridge the gap and overcome the anger and animosity that grew out of the Strike.  

Cal Ripken Jr. helped bring the fans back to baseball. (www.baseballessentials.com)

Cal Ripken Jr. helped bring the fans back to baseball. (www.baseballessentials.com)

September 6, 1995 marked the 2,131st game the Baltimore Orioles had played since that Sunday afternoon in 1982.  Cal Ripken Jr. had come to work sick, injured, healthy, stressed, happy, and sad but most of all he had shown up to work every day and had done his job.  On a Wednesday night in Baltimore at Camden Yards, the Iron Man pass the Iron Horse.  The Orioles won 4-2 over the California Angels and Ripken went 2 for 4 with a solo home run that night, but it did not matter.  What mattered was the joy in the stadium, the joy in seeing a player achieve something that had no short cut, no dollar sign, no superhuman feat.  Simply Cal Ripken Jr. showed up to work, again.  

The memories from the night are plenty.  The standing ovation for Ripken that seemed to last forever.  The announcers on television understanding that words were not necessary.  The Orioles players pushing a reluctant, and almost embarrassed Ripken out of the dugout to take a victory lap around the field.  Everyone, fans, umpires, opposing players, and teammates applauding Ripken’s accomplishment.  Cal Ripken Jr. helped to save the game of baseball that September night.  He showed baseball fans that the game had not been ruined by the money and the business, it still was a children’s game played by adults.  He showed the players and owners that the game does not belong to them, it belongs to the fans.  

Baseball and life are a grind.  You show up every day working towards a perfection that is impossible to reach.  You show up because it is your job to put in an honest days work to receive and honest days pay.  Cal Ripken Jr. saved the game of baseball by reminded all of us this 20 years ago.
DJ