Tagged: George Sisler

Hit Parade

Single season records can be reached without the need for a career filled with success. Players only need to have a single magical season to reach these marks. Think Roger Maris in 1961 or even a career year like Mark Fidrych in 1976. The toughest record to beat now may be the single season hits record. Ichiro Suzuki collected 262 hits in 2004, finally topping George Sisler’s single season record of 257 hits that had stood since 1920. There have been 530 individual efforts where a player collected at least 200 hits in a season. Many players have had multiple 200 hit seasons, with Ichiro and Pete Rose holding the record with ten 200 hit seasons.

200 hits in a single season is not a rare accomplishment. We’ve seen, over the last several seasons, a handful of players collecting 200 hits. However, the Houston Astros have the talent to potentially do something no team has ever done by having four teammates collect 200 hits in the same season. Only three times in Major League history has a team had three teammates collect 200 hits in the same season, but never a fourth. The 1963 St. Louis Cardinals, the 1982 Milwaukee Brewers, and the 1991 Texas Rangers had three teammates collect 200 hits. Teammates who are able to consistently hit and get on base does not necessarily translate to success. The 1963 Cardinals finished 2nd in the National League, 6 games behind the Dodgers for the Pennant. The 1982 Brewers lost the World Series in seven games to the Cardinals. The 1991 Rangers finished 3rd in the American League West, 10 games behind the Twins. Success in baseball is a team effort. Simply having a third or more of your lineup hitting all season does not mean you can be lackluster elsewhere.

Altuve
Jose Altuve is Houston’s best hitter. 200 hits a season is close to automatic. (Elaine Thompson, STF)

The 2017 Houston Astros could be the first team to have four teammates collect 200 hits in the same season thanks to the ABC’S. Jose Altuve, Alex Bregman, Carlos Correa, and George Springer. Jose Altuve is a hitting machine, for whom not collecting 200 hits in a season would make it a down year. Altuve has collected at least 200 hits in three out of five full seasons in the Majors. Bregman has hit at every level in college and in the minors and should continue to develop into an outstanding consistent bat in the Houston lineup. Bregman played in only 146 minor league games after being drafted by Houston out of LSU. Starting at A Ball, Bregman batted .259, High A .319, AA .297, and AAA .333. Bregman can hit and he is starting to settle in with the Astros. Correa is a do it all super star in the making. Entering his third full season in the Majors, Correa continues to improve his strikeout to walk rate. Correa is still learning to hit at the Major League level and his strikeout rate should continue to decline. George Springer is an everyday player who can reach 200 hits simply by cutting down on his strikeouts and focusing on hitting singles and doubles instead of swinging for the fences. In 2016, his first full healthy season in the Majors, Springer hit 29 doubles and 29 home runs with 88 walks and 178 strikeouts. If he can combine plate discipline to draw more walks and cutting down on his big swings to strike out less, perhaps down to 125 times a season, that may translate to 50 more balls in play each season. Springer collected 168 hits against those 178 strikeouts. 50 more balls in play could mean collecting 200 hits.

Bregman
Alex Bregman is still getting comfortable in the Majors, but he has shown from college through the minors and in Houstn that he can hit. (Bob Levey/Getty Images)

The ability to hit and get on base will become slightly easier as opposing teams may prefer to face Altuve, Bregman, Correa, and/or Springer than give up crushing scores to the big bats behind them in the lineup. Carlos Beltran, Evan Gattis, and Brian McCann can all launch a baseball over the fence with cautionary frequency. Every night at least two of the three power bats will be protecting Houston’s hit parade. Every night is a new nightmare for opposing pitchers. They’re faced with either a swift destruction from power or the drowning quicksand from a constant stream of singles here and doubles there.

Astros Manager A.J. Hinch has had George Springer leading off, setting the stage for Jose Altuve batting third and Carlos Correa batting fourth. Once the speed and contact have put the pressure on opposing pitchers Hinch has had Carlos Beltran, Brian McCann, and/or Evan Gattis batting fourth or fifth in nearly every game. Alex Bregman has most often worked to reset the stage by batting eighth, but he also has the second most at bats in the Astros lineup batting second or sixth. Bregman appears to be the utility batter for Houston as he can help the Astros turn the batting order over or he can fill in to help set the stage for Altuve, Correa, or the power of Beltran, McCann, or Gattis.

Correa
Is there anything Carlos Correa can’t do on the diamond? (Brace Hemmelgam/Getty Images)

There are three major factors that may hamper the quest for four single-season, 200-hit teammates for the 2017 Astros. First is the relative youth of Bregman, Correa, and Springer. Slumps and growing pains are often a matter of when, not if, especially for younger hitters. Every batter struggles at one point in their career in some way, past success does not guarantee future success. Second, injuries. The Major League season is a 162 game grind that breaks down even the strongest and toughest players in the world. The Astros are not immune to injuries and missing even a week or more could put 200 hits out of reach for a player. Third, Houston currently has an 8 game lead in the American League West over the Angels and the Rangers. Any sized lead can disappear over the next four months, but with each passing day the Astros make it a little more difficult to be caught. If the Astros run away with the West, A.J. Hinch could decide to rest his players down the stretch, meaning losing at bats and potential hits to rest them for the playoffs.

George Springer
George Springer can hit plenty of home runs, but his greatest value for the Astros might be getting on base ahead of Houston’s sluggers. (AP Photo/ David J. Phillip)

There are plenty of ifs peppered in the scenario of the Astros having four teammates collect 200 hits in 2017. The Astros’ core is young, the years of tanking have finally provided Houston the draft positioning to get the team they sought all along. A young, dynamic team that is built to win both now and in the future. The quartet of Altuve, Bregman, Correa, and Springer may never collect 200 hits in a season, but 2017 seems to be the first real opportunity for them to make a run at this particular landmark record. The hit parade in Houston is fun to watch and so far has resulted in plenty of wins for the Astros. The hits record would be nice, but the Astros are only concerned with winning their first World Series.

DJ

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The Liquor Store and the Cold War

Savannah Valet Service, note the picture in the doorway of Cobb and Jackson. (Blaclbetsy.com)

Savannah Valet Service, note the picture in the doorway of Cobb and Jackson. (Blaclbetsy.com)

Rudolf Anderson, Jr. was born in Spartanburg, SC in September of 1927, the same year that the infamous Murderers’ Row proved to be its most effective, posting a .714 winning percentage for the regular season, and defeating the Pittsburgh Pirates in four games to win the World Series.  That same year Joseph Jefferson Jackson was living in south Georgia operating a dry cleaners, the Savannah Valet Service, after having managed the Waycross Coastliners to a state championship two years prior.  The same season he played center field for the Coastliners batting .577, even occasionally switching sides to bat for both teams

The 1925 Waycross Coastliners. Jackson is 3rd from the right. (blackbetsy.com)

The 1925 Waycross Coastliners. Jackson is 3rd from the right. (Blackbetsy.com)

Years earlier, in 1919,  the man who owned the Savannah Valet Service, had been know as “Shoeless” Joe Jackson.  He had been one of the most dramatic offensive weapons in Major League Baseball.  He batted .351 for the season, fourth best in the Majors, behind Ty Cobb, Bobby Veach, and George Sisler, had 181 hits, behind only Cobb and Veach (both had 191), and led the majors in at bats per strikeout, striking out on average only once per 51.6 AB.  By comparison, the 2013 leader, Nori Aoki, had one strikeout for every 14.9 AB.  Putting that into math terms, Aoki struck out 3.46 times more often last season than Jackson did in 1919.

Four years after the 1919 Black Sox scandal had rocked Major League Baseball, Jackson was still playing baseball, albeit in the minor leagues in Georgia and South Carolina.  During this time he was still pleading with Kennesaw Mountain Landis, named baseball’s first commissioner in 1920 in attempts to repair baseballs image, to reinstate him into the game.  In 1921 a jury in Chicago found the eight men accused not guilty of any wrongdoing in relation to the series.  Despite this, Landis continued his refusal to reinstate of any of the players associated with the scandal.  

Black Sox in court

Black Sox in court (law2.umkc.edu)

In 1933 Jackson moved back to his hometown of Greenville, South Carolina and played for a few minor league teams.  At the same time he opened up a short lived BBQ restaurant, and later a liquor store on Pendleton Street in Greenville.  Jackson operated the liquor store until his death on December 5, 1951.

Joe Jackson's Liquor Store (Blackbetsy.com)

Joe Jackson’s Liquor Store (Blackbetsy.com)

In 1944, and the aforementioned Rudolf Anderson, Jr. had moved with his family to Greenville, South Carolina and he enrolled at Clemson University studying textile manufacturing.  During his time at school he was involved across campus, from intramural football, basketball, swimming, and softball.  Most importantly to his life and his place in history though, he was involved with the Air Force ROTC program.  

Major Rudolf Anderson, USAF

Major Rudolf Anderson, USAF (History.com)

Anderson did not possess the ability to catch things as well as Jackson.  In his senior year Anderson was on the third floor of the campus barracks when a pigeon flew into the hall.  Anderson chased the bird down the hall and failed to stop before he fell out of the window, hitting the eaves over the door on the way down.  He suffered a completely dislocated wrist, fractured pelvis, and lacerations to the head.  

After graduation, Anderson joined the Air Force.  He served time in Korea earning two Distinguished Flying Crosses for reconnaissance missions flown over Korea in his RF-86 Sabre.  Four years after the ceasefire in Korea, he qualified on the U-2 and joined the 4088th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing.  There he logged over 1,000 hours making him the top U-2 pilot the wing had to offer.

In 1962 a large influx of people and supplies from the USSR to Cuba, then President John F. Kennedy directed Strategic Air Command to fly reconnaissance over Cuba to investigate the nature of the shipments.  The 4088th was tasked with the assignment, and after flyovers by Major Richard Heyser and Major Rudolf Anderson, Jr, photographic proof of ballistic missile sites on Cuba became available.  On October 22 the President addressed the United States for nearly 18 minutes detailing the gravity of the situation. 

October 14-28, better known as the Cuban Missile Crisis, saw the two superpowers, the US and USSR play a game of brinksmanship that has never been matched.  Mutually Assured Destruction (MAD) was discussed as a realistic option, whereby both parties would destroy the other with their entire nuclear arsenal, effectively ending all life.  Not unlikely, was the start of World War III.

It was during this time that Major Anderson met his fate.  On October 27th, Anderson was flying yet another reconnaissance mission over Cuba in a U-2 when he was shot down.  It was expected that shrapnel from the explosion punctured his suit and caused it to decompress at an operating altitude of 70,000 (13.25 miles).  Major Anderson would become the only combat death of the Cuban Missile Crisis.  The surface to air missile that shot him down was fired without permission from the Kremlin.  Both Kennedy and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev quickly realized that nuclear war was rapidly becoming a reality and would likely be caused not by the leaders, but a panicky soldier or commander on the ground.  The two sides quickly realized their inevitable loss of control and reeled back the hostilities, and on October 28th, the Crisis was averted.  The Soviets publicly agreeing to dismantle all missile bases in Cuba, and the US publicly agreeing to not invade Cuba.  Privately, the US also agreed to remove its Jupiter missiles from Turkey and Italy.

Rudolph Anderson Memorial (The Winning Run)

Rudolph Anderson Memorial (Greenvilledailyphoto.com)

Major Rudolf Anderson may have been the most important death of the 20th century.  His death highlighted the uncontrollable state of affairs that was unfolding and started the serious communication between the White House and the Kremlin that led to the end of the standoff. Without this dialogue, the reality of a worldwide nuclear holocaust was very real.  

President Kennedy posthumously awarded Anderson the Air Force Cross.  In 1963, the City of Greenville erected a memorial in honor of the downed pilot.  Renovated, the monument, made from an F86-Sabre similar to the one he had flown in Korea, was unveiled again in October 2012 in Cleveland Park in Greenville, South Carolina.

Commissoner Kennesaw Mountain Landis denying Shoeless Joe Jackson's bid to end his ban. (Blackbetsy.com)

Commissoner Kennesaw Mountain Landis denying Shoeless Joe Jackson’s bid to end his ban. (Blackbetsy.com)

Shoeless Joe has been more recently memorialized in the City of Greenville as well with a statue   It can be located near Fluor Field, home of the Greenville Drive, Boston’s single A affiliate.  Across the street from the stadium is Jackson’s house.  It was moved from its original location to 356 Field Street in Greenville.  The home has been transformed into the Shoeless Joe Jackson Museum which is free to tour. The house was give street number 356 in recognition of his lifetime batting average, which remains the third highest all time behind Cobb(.366) and Hornsby (.359) .

Fluor Field, Home of the Greenville Drive and across the street from the Shoeless Joe Jackson Museum. (The Winning RUn)

Fluor Field, Home of the Greenville Drive and across the street from the Shoeless Joe Jackson Museum. (The Winning Run)

Ultimately these men have only have a few things in common.  Both men were able to achieve their dream, Maj. Anderson in the Air Force, and Shoeless Joe in Major League Baseball.  Both men’s dreams ended abruptly, in ways that neither likely expected.  The other thing that they share is Greenville.  They both grew up there, and it is now where they are each buried.  In fact, they are both buried in the same cemetery, Woodlawn Memorial Park.  The cemetery is located across from Bob Jones University in Greenville and is open to the public.

Shoeless Joe’s place in baseball history will always be one of contention, whether he was a hero, a villain, or someone stuck in a no win situation.  Maj. Anderson’s place in history, sadly, is a largely forgotten one despite his overall importance. In the words of Art LaFluer in The Sandlot “Heroes get remembered, but legends never die.”  In their hometown of Greenville, each man is regarded as both.

Joe Jackson's final resting place. (The Winning Run)

Joe Jackson’s final resting place. (The Winning Run)

Major Anderson's final resting place. (The Winning Run)

Major Anderson’s final resting place. (Findagrave.com)

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