The Way of Baseball: Finding Stillness at 95 MPH

The Way of Baseball: Finding Stillness at 95 MPH could be just like any other book written by a former player about their playing career. Shawn Green and Gordon McAlpine could have waxed poetic about the trials and tribulations of Green’s 15-year career. Instead, they did something much better. The Way of Baseball looks at the player, Shawn Green, as a human being instead of an athlete.  Everyone has highs and lows in life, including athletes, but not all of these peaks and valleys make the news. Slumping at the plate can be just as difficult as a rocky relationship. Green and McAlpine do not examine a player’s career or even the game of baseball we see on the field, rather they examine what goes into making baseball and the player.

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The Way of Baseball is more than your typical baseball book. (Christopher Sergio)

Shawn Green was a great player. The Dodgers, and every other MLB team, do not hand out six year, $84 million contracts to every player. He played in two All Star games (1999 and 2002), earned a Silver Slugger Award (1999), and won a Gold Glove (1999). Green retired at the age of 34 with a career .283 BA, 2,003 hits, 445 2B, 328 HR (3 behind Hank Greenberg for the most by a Jewish player), and 1,070 RBI. Green’s retirement was his own decision; injury or old age did not force him out of the game as it does so many other players. Shawn Green played baseball and left baseball under his own terms, and it is abundantly clear throughout the book that he is content with everything baseball did and did not give him during his playing career.

Green and McAlpine focus two main themes: live in the present and do not hold on too tightly. Early in his career, Shawn Green, like so many of us, focused on what went wrong. The ball he misplayed in the outfield, the pitch he should have driven into the gap in the outfield, the managerial decision that reduced his playing time. His frustrations ultimately led him to find his place of peace, hitting off a tee in the batting cage. Everyone should find a place they can put the world away and find peace and for Shawn Green his was hitting a baseball off a tee. Not wanting to ruin the why or the how for those who want to read the book, which I would highly recommend, I will skip over those details. Finding his peace allowed Shawn Green to live in the moment, not swept up with the highs and not crashing back down to earth during the lows.

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Shawn Green found his stillness in the solitude of a batting cage. (Stephen Dunn/ Getty Images)

After learning to live in the present, Green thrives as he adjusts to life changes with marriage and children with an understanding that he cannot hold too tightly to some things. The harder you try and the more you press in baseball the worse the results. Trying to muscle a pitch a little harder or swinging for the fences is to almost a guarantee two things: injuring yourself and failing to achieve your goal. Learning to enjoy the ride and giving your best effort without attempting to force the results allowed Shawn Green to both enjoy playing baseball, but also know when the right time to walk away was for himself. Holding on too tight early on with the Blue Jays and for much of his time with the Dodgers took away his joy for playing baseball. Once he could loosen his grip, Shawn Green was able to enjoy the game like he did as a kid dreaming about playing in the Majors.

The Way of Baseball is unusual in that it does not focus on baseball. While baseball is all around in the book, it is the background noise of the story. The primary focus is on the daily struggles facing people, including baseball players, and how over time Shawn Green learned to live with his limitations, overcome his challenges, and let go of what he could not control. Avoiding any attempt to say that The Way of Baseball is a guidebook on how to approach life, I believe it opens the door to a world that most baseball fans rarely think about, if ever. People and players can find success in baseball in an infinite number of ways the same is true regarding the telling of a player’s career and the impact he had on baseball both during and after his career. Every baseball player is unique; they help to mold baseball from what it is today into what it will be tomorrow. Focusing more on the person instead of the player was refreshing. Not every player can successfully write about themselves and their career in this way, but Shawn Green is such a person.

DJ

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