The Fallen

Memorial Day is when we, collectively as a nation, pause to remember and honor the men and women who have given their lives to protect our freedoms.  The impact of war goes beyond the soldiers who fought; it impacts their families and friends.  When soldiers are deployed overseas, they not only miss anniversaries and birthdays, but they also miss the daily life events.  If you have ever had the opportunity to walk the length of the Vietnam Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. you begin to understand the toll which war has taken on our nation. Every name on the wall is a brother, husband, father, son, grandson, uncle, cousin, and friend who never came home.  The void their deaths have left behind cannot be filled.  So this Memorial Day weekend, and every other day throughout the year, we should slow down from our busy lives and honor the brave men and women who have given the ultimate sacrifice for our nation.

Vietnam War Memorial, Washington DC (www.history.com)

Vietnam War Memorial, Washington DC (www.history.com)

Among the many individuals who we honor this Memorial Day for their sacrifice,we allow six individuals to stand out here.  These men are the only six men who have played in Major League Baseball and died during combat.

Eddie Grant- WWI

“Harvard Eddie” Grant played 10 seasons in the Majors for the Cleveland Naps, Philadelphia Phillies, Cincinnati Reds, and New York Giants.  He compiled a career .249 batting average, stole 153 bases, hit 30 triples, all while playing all four infield positions.  After his retirement in 1915, Grant opened a law firm in Boston before enlisting in the military in April 1917.  Grant fought at the battle of Meuse-Argonne and assumed command after all his superior officers were killed during the four day search for the Lost BattalionGrant was killed during the search by an exploding shell on October 5, 1918.  He was the first Major League player to die in combat during World War I.

Robert “Bun” Troy- WWI

Troy was a German born pitcher who started his only career game on September 15, 1912 for the Detroit Tigers.  In his only Major League appearance Troy went 6 2/3 innings, allowed nine hits, four runs, three walks, struck one batter out, and hit one batter.  The Tigers lost to the Washington Senators 6 to 3.  After several more years in the Minors Troy joined the United States military.  He was shot during the battle of Meuse-Argonne.  He would later die of his wounds at an evacuation hospital on October 7, 1918.

World War I Memorial, Washington DC (phototourismdc.com)

World War I Memorial, Washington DC (phototourismdc.com)

Tom Burr- WWI

Burr played in his only Major League game on April 21, 1914 for the New York Yankees. He was a late inning replacement in the Yankees 10 inning 3 to 2 victory over the Washington Senators.  He did not have any fielding chances or plate appearances.  He returned to Williams College but left for the Army Air Force before graduating.  Burr was killed when the plane he was in collided with another plane on October 12, 1918 over Cazaux, France.

Elmer Gedeon- WWII

Gedeon played in five games for the Washington Senators in September 1939.  He collected all three of his career hits as the starting Centerfielder in the September 19th victory over the Cleveland Indians.  He was recalled from the minors again in 1940, but did not appear in any games.  Gedeon was drafted by the Army in January 1941.  He was later reassigned to the Army Air Force after being accepted into pilot school.  He flew bombing missions over France until April 20, 1944, when his B-26 was assigned to take out a V-1 Buzz Bomb site which was under construction.  Gedeon and five other crew men were killed after their plane was shot down by Germany anti-aircraft guns.

Harry O’Neill- WWII

O’Neill appeared in only one game for the 1939 Philadelphia Athletics.  He caught two innings (8th and 9th inning) after replacing Frankie Hayes during the A’s 16 to 3 lose against the Detroit Tigers.  O’Neill enlisted in the Marines in 1942 and saw action in Saipon were he was injured when he was hit in the shoulder with shrapnel.  After recovering, he was sent back to the Pacific.  He fought on Iwo Jima where he shot and killed by a sniper on March 6, 1945.  He was the last player from Major League Baseball to be Killed in Action during World War II.

World War II Memorial, Washington DC (The Winning Run)

World War II Memorial, Washington DC (The Winning Run)

Robert Neighbors- Korea

Neighbors appeared in seven games in late September for the 1939 St. Louis Browns. He hit .182, with one home run and one RBI.  He entered the Army Air Force in 1942 and remained in the service after World War II ended.  Neighbors flew combat missions in Korea, including a night mission on August 8, 1952, during which his plane was shot down inside North Korea.  No further contact was made with Neighbors or his crew.  His status remained as Missing in Action until July 27, 1953 with the Korean Armistice Agreement and prisoner exchange.  Neighbors status was changed to Killed in Action.  He remains the last Major League Baseball player to die in combat.

Korean War Memorial, Washington DC (www.winnipesaukee.com)

Korean War Memorial, Washington DC (www.winnipesaukee.com)

These six men are among the thousands who have sacrificed their lives to protect the freedoms we all enjoy. They are the only former Major League players to die in combat.  However they are not the only ones associated with the game of baseball to have died serving our country.  Former baseball players from every level have given their lives during their service in the military during in Pre-World War IWorld War IWorld War IIKoreaPeace time, Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq.

This Memorial Day take some time to remember these men and the other men and women who have given the ultimate sacrifice for the nation.  To those who have served or are serving, thank you for everything you have done.  To those who have served and given the ultimate sacrifice, as well as the families they have left behind, we are forever in your debt.  On this Memorial Day we thank you and honor the sacrifices you have made.

D

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