Is This Real Life, Or Is This Just Fantasy

You can call me fanatical, old school, oblivious, or just stubborn but I believe there is a right way and a wrong way to play baseball. I cheer for my team, some times maybe a little too hard, but never to the point of being irrational. I prefer the hit and run or the sacrifice bunt to playing for a 3 run home run, although I do not believe there is anything necessarily wrong with home runs, I just prefer to see runs manufactured instead of waiting for the long ball that may never come. This is just how I prefer to see the game played.

There is however, one thing that I absolutely hate seeing in baseball and wish it was completely removed from the game, it is players gaining an unfair advantage through drugs. I do not mind it when players try to gain an advantage by kicking rocks into a speedy runners shoes, selling an umpire on a catch they did not make, pretending to get hit by a pitch, and a million other things that players have long done to try to gain an edge on their opponents. Plenty of people will say that this is a double standard, that both are cheating and therefore they should both be looked down upon. This is how I make the distinction between the two. One allows you to theoretically gain an advantage in winning a game. The other has the potential to do physical harm.

When Derek Jeter pretends to get hit by a pitch against the Tampa Bay Rays, what harm is done by his cheating? Rays Manager Joe Maddon is ejected for arguing, Jeter is awarded first base, the pitcher must now face another hitter but now with a runner on first, Jeter can potentially score a run which could decide who wins or loses the game, and the American League East or Wild Card standings could be altered. This is not good as it could change how the game plays out. Emphasis on this being a game. Jeter did exactly what I believe many other players would do, he sought to, and was successful at, gaining an advantage for his team. Yes he cheated, but ultimately baseball is just a game and there are much more important issues facing the world other than who won today’s game.

Fooled ya!

Fooled ya!

When Ryan Braun is taking whatever drug he is using to allow him to play better there is a real danger involved, to himself and to others. Many of the drugs that are available to players do not have a long history of testing so the long term ramifications of using them is not fully understood. There may be long term health concerns associated with these drugs, but I, nor anyone else, should be able to tell a grown man what he can and cannot do to his own body. Everyone has the right to do what they would like with their body, so long as they are not harming others. This is where players like Braun and Alex Rodriguez cross the line. Their use of performance-enhancing drugs puts other players and fans in increased danger. If their drug of choice makes them 5% stronger then it also means that a thrown pitch or a batted ball back to the pitch will move 5% faster. This cuts down on the reaction time for other players or fans to protect themselves against the baseball. In 2012 the average fastball in Major League Baseball was 91.35 mph. A batter has 0.399 seconds to react to the pitch. In this small amount of time they must determine if the ball is a strike or a ball, if they will swing or not, or if they need to protect themselves from the pitch. Ultimately it all comes down to reflexes, because no one can truly think this quickly. Now back to the performance-enhancing drugs taken by a player. If the pitcher is taking the drugs then the 5% boost they get means the opposing batter now has an even shorter amount of time to react to decide to swing or not or to protect themselves. The 91.35 mph fastball is now traveling at 95.91 mph. Giving the hitter 0.380 seconds to react. The lose of 0.019 seconds to react can mean the difference between having your head turned away, your shoulder raised, or your back turned. If the batter is using the the 5% boost could mean a pitcher does not have time to raise their arms to protect themselves, open their glove to try to deflect or catch the ball, or even seeing the ball coming at them at all. Remember this is just the difference which a 5% boost in performance can make on an average fastball. Imagine how short the elapsed time becomes if the pitch is already an above average fastball and the performance increase is more than 5%. The baseball could easily permanently injure a player, or worse.

Imagine stepping into the batters box if Aroldis Chapman threw 5% harder.

Imagine stepping into the batters box if Aroldis Chapman threw 5% harder.

Major League Baseball is cleaning up the sport and those players who test positive for the performance-enhancing drugs or are associated with them are ostracized from the game. Personally I wish the penalties were harsher than they currently are, but that will hopefully come in time. The average fan has no recourse against these dirty players other than boo them. Giving people a second chance in life is important, but when you damage something that I love it is harder to allow for that second chance. This is why I do what I can to see the game cleaned up and for the good guys in the game to get their time in the sun. the fantasy baseball league I play in has the following six rules:

  1. Any and all players who have been suspended or accused of PED use are ineligible to be drafted or added to the roster later in the season.

  2. If you play a player who have been suspended or accused of PED use, whether knowingly or unknowingly, you must immediately drop the player and leave an open spot in your line up for 7 days.

  3. You can only add a new player to replace the dirty player after the 7 days have passed.

  4. Each player will police themselves in regards to hating dirty players.

  5. If you draft Alex Rodriguez or Ryan Braun, you are a complete moron.

  6. The following players are on the banned list, plus any who get busted during the season: 

I in no way contend that my banning of all dirty players from my league has any real impact on someone like Ryan Braun. I am not delusional enough to think that he remotely cares what I think. However, it gives me and the people I play against the satisfaction of knowing that the players who we use in our league play the game the right way. It is our way of hitting back against the players who cheat in such a way that it could potentially hurt someone.

Better to have a broken bat than broken face.

Better to have a broken bat than broken face.

I love baseball and do not want anything or anyone to ruin it. Yes fans and the media come down harsher on players when they are busted or suspected of using performance-enhancing drugs, but it is because baseball is held to a higher standard. It is America’s past time. During World War II, the Japanese did not yell “to hell with Sammy Baugh”, they yelled “to hell with Babe Ruth”. Baseball and its records are the most haloed among the major sports in America. The media coverage is not as intense or as long when a basketball player starts closing in on an all time record, but with baseball the media attention can become overwhelming when a player closes in on a single season record. Baseball and its fans deserve to have players who respect the game and its history. Major League Baseball has become serious about cleaning up the game and the growing disgust and animosity toward those found to have used performance-enhancing drugs is a sign that the game is on the right track.

D

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3 comments

  1. Pingback: The Dilemma: The Pete Rose Story « The Winning Run
  2. Pingback: 600 Is The New 500 « The Winning Run

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